Sickle Cell Disease Treated with Stem Cells

Patients with sickle cell anemia have utilized stem cells from their siblings to treat the disease.

Researchers led by Matthew Hsieh of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute have reversed sickle cell disease in adults by utilizing stem cells from the patients’ siblings.  The patients received a transplant that combined their own stem cells with those of a sibling, resulting in an increase in lung function and a decrease in the patients’ sickle cell count, as well as their dependency on immunosuppressant and pain relieving drugs. Continue reading

Harnessing the Power of Stem Cells

Scientists have developed a method for increasing the survival rate, and therefore the effectiveness, of transplanted mesenchymal stem cells.

A team of scientists from the Harvard Stem Cell Institute and the Boston Children’s Hospital have developed a method to increase the survival rate, and therefore the effectiveness, of transplanted mesenchymal stem cells [MSCs]. In an animal model, Dr. Juan Melero-Martin and his team of researchers co-transplanted MSCs with blood vessel-forming cells, enabling the stem cells to survive longer in a patient to reach their full regenerative potential.

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