Bone Regeneration Made Possible With Stem Cells

Epibone creates precisely measured scaffolding for stem cells to recreate damaged bone.

The New York-based startup Epibone intends to begin human testing on a procedure that will utilize stem cells to regenerate living bone tissue.  The researchers, originally from Columbia University, will apply autologous [the patient’s own] stem cells to nanofiber scaffolding of the desired size and shape and direct the stem cells to differentiate into a physical and genetic replica of the patient’s own bone. Continue reading

Osteoarthritis Stem Cell Treatment in Clinical Trial

The transplantation of stem cells into areas affected by osteoarthritis allow lost cartilage tissue to regenerate.

In recent clinical trials, researchers at the National University of Ireland Galway have successfully utilized adult stem cells to treat patients with osteoarthritis.  The treatment involves recovering the patients’ own [autologous] stem cells and then injecting the stem cells into cartilage to stimulate the regeneration of lost tissue. Continue reading

Athletes Utilizing Their Own Stem Cells to Treat Injuries.

Surgeons utilizing the patient’s own stem cells could significantly reduce rehabilitation times for injured athletes.

Orthopedic Surgeons are utilizing autologous [the patient’s own] stem cells to treat injuries and degenerative diseases in the joints and bones of athletes.  The treatments involve the recovery of the patient’s own mesenchymal stem cells – which are particularly plastic and can differentiate into a variety of tissue types and implanting them back into the damaged bone or joint to reduce inflammation and regenerate damaged tissue without the need for invasive surgery.  Continue reading

Treating Arthritis with Stem Cells

damaged knee and mesenchymal stem cells

Arthritis affects 44 million individuals in the US resulting in the need for approximately 700,000 knee-replacement and 100,000 hip replacement surgeries every year. Researchers at Stanford University have developed a technique to track the effectiveness of mesenchymal stem cells [the type of stem cells found in teeth] in repairing arthritic joints. Mesenchymal stem cells are capable of differentiating into bone and cartilage, as well as muscle, fat and tendon.  The researchers expect to adapt the study for clinical trials in humans this fall.

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