Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome Treatment Integrates Cardiac Stem Cells.

Initial trials of stem cell treatment for hypoplastic left heart syndrome have proven to be both safe and effective for children with the congenital defect.

Researchers from Okayama University have developed a method to treat the congenital heart defect known as hypoplastic left heart syndrome [HLHS] by utilizing a specialized cardiac stem cell.  In a Phase I clinical trial conducted on children suffering from HLHS, the scientists concluded that, because the young stem cells in children are more abundant and self-renewing than those in adults, intracoronary injection of stem cells is a safe and feasible approach to treating the condition. Continue reading

Lung Regeneration Made Possible through Stem Cells.

Scientists have found a stem cell line that specializes in restoring lung tissue

Jackson Laboratory scientists have identified the adult lung stem cells p63+/Krt5+ as the specific cell line that specializes in lung regeneration.  In an animal model, professors Frank McKeon, Ph.D. and Wa Xian, Ph.D. observed as the p63+/Krt5+, which typically mature into the lungs’ alveoli, responded to lung damage caused by the H1N1 influenza virus by migrating to the sites of inflammation and restoring the lost tissue. Continue reading

Inflammatory Disease Healed with Stem Cells

Stem cells located in the gums have the ability to regulate inflammatory conditions.

A research team led by Dr. Songtao Shi from the Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry of USC has discovered that mesenchymal stem cells [MSCs] found in the gums are able to regulate the body’s immune system to treat inflammatory diseases.  In an animal model suffering from colitis [an inflamed condition of the colon], the scientists were able to transplant these gingival MSCs, significantly reducing the inflammation. Continue reading

A Sight for Sore Eyes – Stem Cells Discovered on Surface of Retina.

Scientists may one day be able to treat AMD with stem cells from the retina.

A team of researchers led by Professor Andrew Lotery at Southampton General Hospital have discovered a source of retinal stem cells on the surface of the eye.  If scientists can harvest these readily accessible stem cells, convert them to light-sensitive cells, and then transplant them back into the eye, the cells could provide new treatments for age-related macular degeneration [AMD].

Currently, AMD is the leading cause for blindness in patients over the age of 50, and there is no known cure. However, the discovery of stem cells on the retina could facilitate a new method for scientists to replenish the light-sensitive cells in a patient’s eyes without the risk of rejection by the immune system, presenting a new potential treatment for the disease.

Although AMD tends to affect patients later on in life, the higher regenerative abilities of younger stem cells are preferable over older ones for medical therapies.  One way to assure access to the enhanced regenerative abilities of your own stem cells is to preserve them while they are still young, so that they can be used later in life in emerging regenerative therapies. Today, preserving your own stem cells, also known as autologous stem cells, is simple and affordable for families. To learn how you can preserve your own valuable stem cells through non-invasive and effective methods, please visit StemSave or call 877-783-6728 (877-StemSave) today.

 

 

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The Future of Regenerative Medicine is Now™.

Male Infertility Research Identifies Sperm-Producing Stem Cells.

A new method of identifying sperm-producing stem cells could lead to stem cell treatments for male sterility.

In a recent study conducted by the University Of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, scientists have discovered a rare line of stem cells involved in regulating spermatogenesis [the production of sperm cells].  Furthermore, these stem cells are resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy, which are toxic to the male germline and common causes for male infertility. Continue reading

Esophagus Engineered with Stem Cells In-Vivo.

Scientists have utilized stem cells to engineer an esophagus without exogenous growth factors.

Researchers from the Saban Research Institute of Children’s Hospital Los Angeles have grown esophageal tissue in vivo (in the body) from stem cells without the use of exogenous growth factors.  In an animal model, the scientists transplanted stem cells, as well as a simple biodegradable scaffold, and relied on the stem cells’ ability to migrate towards the tissue in need of repair.  The cells then differentiated into the epithelial, muscle, and nerve cells to develop a healthy esophagus. Continue reading

MIT Develops New Stem Cell Isolation Technique.

Researchers have discovered a method of purifying mesenchymal stem cells from the other cells within the bone marrow.

In a new study, researchers from the Singapore-MIT Alliance in Research and Technology have identified three physical characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells [MSCs] that can distinguish them from other bone marrow-derived cell types. By isolating cells in the bone marrow based on size, stiffness, and fluctuations in the nuclear membrane, scientists can rapidly generate and purify the stem cells needed to treat patients.    Continue reading

The Nose Knows – The Importance of Stem Cells.

Stem cells are regulators for critical connections between the nose and the brain.

Scientists from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke have identified neural stem cells as important regulators of the olfactory bulb and its connections to the brain. The researchers discovered that a constant influx of stem cells is required for the olfactory system to function properly.  The removal of stem cells causes a widespread disruption of signals sent to the brain, resulting in sensory deprivation. Continue reading

Brain Tumor Chemotherapy Delivered via Stem Cells.

Scientists hope to use stem cells to minimize collateral damage from brain tumor chemotherapy treatments.

Neuroscientist Dr. Karen Aboody, M.D. and Oncologist Dr. Jana Portnow, M.D. from City of Hope Hospital are set to begin a phase 1 clinical trial for a method of delivering chemotherapy treatments to glioblastoma [aggressive brain tumors] with modified neural stem cells.  The scientists plan to capitalize on the stem cells’ innate ability to seek out invasive tumors by loading the cells with a chemotherapeutic protein and then injecting them into the brain. Continue reading

CRISPR Advances Genetic Disease Treatment with Stem Cells.

CRISPR may change the way scientists incorporate stem cells for translational genomics.

Scientists led by Dr. Craig Mello of The University of Massachusetts have developed a genetic tool – CRISPR [clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats] – to revolutionize the way stem cells are applied to treat genetic diseases, such as sickle cell or thalassemia.  CRISPR aims to expedite and improve upon the process of translational genomics, in which the patient’s stem cells are extracted, altered to repair the damaged gene, and then transplanted back to the patient. Continue reading