Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome Treatment Integrates Cardiac Stem Cells.

Initial trials of stem cell treatment for hypoplastic left heart syndrome have proven to be both safe and effective for children with the congenital defect.

Researchers from Okayama University have developed a method to treat the congenital heart defect known as hypoplastic left heart syndrome [HLHS] by utilizing a specialized cardiac stem cell.  In a Phase I clinical trial conducted on children suffering from HLHS, the scientists concluded that, because the young stem cells in children are more abundant and self-renewing than those in adults, intracoronary injection of stem cells is a safe and feasible approach to treating the condition. Continue reading

Atherosclerotic Lesions Prevented by MSCs

Stem cells were found to reduce plaque in patients with atherosclerosis.

According to new research from the National Yang-Ming University, mesenchymal stem cells [MSCs] hold the ability to limit atherosclerotic plaque formation, thereby preventing the onset of harmful endothelial lesions. The research team, led by Shih-Chieh Hung, transplanted MSCs into animal models with atherosclerosis and observed significant reduction in plaque formation. They also saw an increase in blood vessel dilation, which prevents further plaque development, indicating good endothelial health. Continue reading

Feeling the Burn: Fat Loss Therapy Utilizes Stem Cells.

Scientists have identified two stimulants that induce stem cells to mature into brown fat cells instead of unhealthy white fat cells.

According to a recent study conducted by scientists at the Harvard Stem Cell Institute, stem cells may hold the key to replacing the body’s unwanted storage of white fat cells with calorie-burning brown fat cells. The researchers studied the stem cells that typically mature into white fat cells, and, after screening the effects of 1000 compounds on the cells, they found two that stimulate the stem cells to differentiate into brown fat cells instead.  Continue reading

Stem Cells With a Heart of Gold.

Scientists use gold nanoparticles to improve stem cell transplants for heart disease patients.

A team of bioengineers from Tel Aviv University is currently developing a scaffold to help regenerate heart muscle through the use of autologous stem cells.  The scientists, led by Dr. Tal Dvir, aim to replace damaged cardiac tissue in heart attack patients by creating a scaffold out of collagen and gold nanoparticles, and then infusing it with the patient’s own stem cells to stimulate the rejuvenation of cardiomyocytes. Continue reading

Harnessing the Power of Stem Cells

Scientists have developed a method for increasing the survival rate, and therefore the effectiveness, of transplanted mesenchymal stem cells.

A team of scientists from the Harvard Stem Cell Institute and the Boston Children’s Hospital have developed a method to increase the survival rate, and therefore the effectiveness, of transplanted mesenchymal stem cells [MSCs]. In an animal model, Dr. Juan Melero-Martin and his team of researchers co-transplanted MSCs with blood vessel-forming cells, enabling the stem cells to survive longer in a patient to reach their full regenerative potential.

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Heart Disease Treatment Utilizes Mesenchymal Stem Cells [MSCs]

Cell-Kro has the potential to rebuild damaged portions of the heart using the patient’s own stem cells.

Researchers from the University of Vermont have developed a novel and effective application of mesenchymal stem cells [the same type found in Dental Stem Cells] to treat heart disease. The MSCs, when transplanted along with cardiac stem cells into the heart [in an animal model], produced a “cocktail” of protective ligands that improved the grafting success of the cardiac stem cells. Continue reading

Stem Cells Studied to Prevent Heart Dysfunction in Children With Cancer

A patient’s own stem cells will allow doctors to evaluate the risks involved in chemotherapy.

A team from the Royal Children’s Hospital, the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute and the University of Melbourne has begun studying stem cell-derived heart cells from children with cancer to observe which samples are most damaged from chemotherapy drugs.  In a first of-its-kind study, researchers are taking stem cells from the patient, growing heart cells in the lab and subjecting them to a cocktail of chemotherapy drugs. The reaction of the cells to the treatments helps determine which patients are more likely to develop heart disease [later on in life] from different chemotherapy options. Continue reading

Treating Heart Attacks With Your Own Stem Cells

Stem Cells used in heart regeneration

Scientists have used stem cells to successfully regenerate heart tissue

Researchers Dr. Luis Gruberg and Dr. Allen Jeremias, from the Stony Brook Heart Institute and Intensive Care Unit, have conducted a clinical study utilizing the patient’s own stem cells to treat them after suffering a severe heart attack. The treatement, which involves infusing millions of autologous [the patient’s own] stem cells into the coronary artery, successfully regenerated damaged tissue in the heart. Continue reading

Mayo Clinic Advances Stem Cell Treatment for Heart Disease

Stem cells used to treat heart disease

Mayo Clinic Researchers have used autologous stem cells to treat heart disease

Mayo Clinic researchers from the Center of Regenerative Medicine have utilized a patient’s own stem cells in a novel treatment for heart disease. The treatment involves harvesting the patient’s own stem cells, expanding and differentiating them in-vitro [outside the body] and transplanting them back into the patient. As a result of the successful initial study, a wider clinical trial is planned.

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Mayo Clinic – Replacing Pacemakers With Stem Cells

Heart

Mayo Clinic researchers have resynchronized a disrupted heartbeat by using stem cells. Dr. Andre Terzic, a senior author of the study explained, “By harnessing the potential of regenerative medicine – repairing the injured heart, in this case – we will be increasingly able to provide more definitive solutions to our patients”.

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