A Sight for Sore Eyes – Stem Cells Discovered on Surface of Retina.

Scientists may one day be able to treat AMD with stem cells from the retina.

A team of researchers led by Professor Andrew Lotery at Southampton General Hospital have discovered a source of retinal stem cells on the surface of the eye.  If scientists can harvest these readily accessible stem cells, convert them to light-sensitive cells, and then transplant them back into the eye, the cells could provide new treatments for age-related macular degeneration [AMD].

Currently, AMD is the leading cause for blindness in patients over the age of 50, and there is no known cure. However, the discovery of stem cells on the retina could facilitate a new method for scientists to replenish the light-sensitive cells in a patient’s eyes without the risk of rejection by the immune system, presenting a new potential treatment for the disease.

Although AMD tends to affect patients later on in life, the higher regenerative abilities of younger stem cells are preferable over older ones for medical therapies.  One way to assure access to the enhanced regenerative abilities of your own stem cells is to preserve them while they are still young, so that they can be used later in life in emerging regenerative therapies. Today, preserving your own stem cells, also known as autologous stem cells, is simple and affordable for families. To learn how you can preserve your own valuable stem cells through non-invasive and effective methods, please visit StemSave or call 877-783-6728 (877-StemSave) today.



To view the full article, click here.



The Future of Regenerative Medicine is Now™.

CRISPR Advances Genetic Disease Treatment with Stem Cells.

CRISPR may change the way scientists incorporate stem cells for translational genomics.

Scientists led by Dr. Craig Mello of The University of Massachusetts have developed a genetic tool – CRISPR [clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats] – to revolutionize the way stem cells are applied to treat genetic diseases, such as sickle cell or thalassemia.  CRISPR aims to expedite and improve upon the process of translational genomics, in which the patient’s stem cells are extracted, altered to repair the damaged gene, and then transplanted back to the patient. Continue reading

Age-Related Macular Degeneration Treatment Utilizes Stem Cells

Stem Cell implants could replace damaged cells affected by AMD.

Collaborating reseachers from the Department of Ophthalmology at the Bonn University Hospital and the Neural Stem Cell Institute in New York have successfully replaced damaged cells in eyes impaired by Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) with human stem cells. This implantation technique, conducted in an animal study is the first of its kind and represents a significant advance in developing personalized treatments for patients suffering from a variety of age-related visual impairment issues. Continue reading

Novel Use of Stem Cells Advance Treatment Options for Macular Degeneration

Researchers at University of Wisconsin’s McPherson Eye Research Institute are utilizing stem cells to develop a patient-specific model of a rare form of macular degeneration – Best Disease.   The model has led researchers to a better understanding of the cellular processes that cause the disease which should lead to the development of more effective treatment options.
Continue reading

Stem Cell Treatment for Dry Age-Related Macular Degeneration Entering Clinical Trial Phase







A Phase I/II clinical trial to treat dry age-related macular degeneration (Dry-AMD) is being conducted by StemCells, Inc.  Dry-AMD is the most common type of macular degeneration and affects 90% of patients with the condition. It is a chronic eye disease that causes vision loss in the center of the field of vision and is the major cause of blindness and visual impairment in adults older than 50.

Continue reading