Tipping the Scales: Stem Cells May Help Prevent Obesity and More.

Scientists have found that the alteration of stem cell cilia can have a positive effect on weight loss.

 

In a recently published study from the Queen Mary University of London, scientists discovered a connection between the length of cilia [hair-like projections for cell movement] on stem cells and their proclivity towards differentiating into fat cells.  By restricting the elongation of stem cell cilia, the researchers were able to impede on the formation of new fat cells. Continue reading

An Eye for a Tooth: Corneal Blindness Treatment Advances With The Use Of Dental Stem Cells.

Dental Stem Cells may hold the potential to cure corneal blindness.

Ophthalmologists James L Funderburgh, Ph.D. and Fatima Syed-Picard, Ph.D. from the University of Pittsburgh have devised a method for treating corneal blindness by utilizing dental pulp stem cells.  The researchers harvested the stem cells from molars discarded during routine extraction and induced the cells to differentiate into keratocytes [corneal cells].  They then seeded the cells onto a nanofiber scaffold, allowing them to grow into fully developed, functional corneas capable of restoring eyesight.    Continue reading

A Sight for Sore Eyes – Stem Cells Discovered on Surface of Retina.

Scientists may one day be able to treat AMD with stem cells from the retina.

A team of researchers led by Professor Andrew Lotery at Southampton General Hospital have discovered a source of retinal stem cells on the surface of the eye.  If scientists can harvest these readily accessible stem cells, convert them to light-sensitive cells, and then transplant them back into the eye, the cells could provide new treatments for age-related macular degeneration [AMD].

Currently, AMD is the leading cause for blindness in patients over the age of 50, and there is no known cure. However, the discovery of stem cells on the retina could facilitate a new method for scientists to replenish the light-sensitive cells in a patient’s eyes without the risk of rejection by the immune system, presenting a new potential treatment for the disease.

Although AMD tends to affect patients later on in life, the higher regenerative abilities of younger stem cells are preferable over older ones for medical therapies.  One way to assure access to the enhanced regenerative abilities of your own stem cells is to preserve them while they are still young, so that they can be used later in life in emerging regenerative therapies. Today, preserving your own stem cells, also known as autologous stem cells, is simple and affordable for families. To learn how you can preserve your own valuable stem cells through non-invasive and effective methods, please visit StemSave or call 877-783-6728 (877-StemSave) today.

 

 

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The Future of Regenerative Medicine is Now™.

New York Times: The Eruption of Stem Cell Therapies.

Mr. Edgar Irastorza is one of thousands of people already benefiting from the progression of stem cell based therapies.

As reported on the front page of the New York Times Science section, clinical applications of stem cell based therapies are accelerating at a rate that will revolutionize the medical field in a matter of years.  In the United States alone, there are currently over 4000 therapies in clinical trials for the treatment of heart disease, blindness, spinal cord injuries, diabetes, H.I.V., and other diseases, injuries, and traumas. Continue reading

Retinal Tissue Created from Stem Cells.

Scientists have created light-sensitive retinal tissue from human stem cells.

A team of researchers from John Hopkins University of Medicine have developed miniature human retinal tissue in vitro with the ability to detect light. The scientists, led by Assistant Professor M. Valena Canto-Soler, constructed a 3D model of the retinal tissue containing photoreceptor stem cells that form light sensitive tissue in the back of the eye. Continue reading

Eye Cells Developed with Autologous Stem Cells May Lead to Vision Restoration.

Scientists have utilized stem cells to create viable eye tissue in vitro.

Two studies presented at the 2014 Annual Meeting of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology in Orlando, FL, have proposed methods to differentiate autologous non-embryonic stem cells into various eye cells that can be utilized to replace damaged tissue in patients with impaired vision. In one study the researchers converted stem cells in the front of the eye to nerve cells in the back of the eye. In the second, stem cells were introduced to specific growth factors that promoted their development into eye tissue. Continue reading

Blindness Treatment Utilizes Stem Cells to Partially Restore Vision.

The use of adult stem cells can potentially treat a wide range of visual impairments.

Researchers from the Institute for Ophthalmology at the University College of London report on a significant advancement in stem cell therapy that can potentially lead to new treatments for blindness.  Adult stem cells were manipulated into rod cells and then injected into blind animal models, partially restoring the vision of the animals.  Continue reading

Age-Related Macular Degeneration Treatment Utilizes Stem Cells

Stem Cell implants could replace damaged cells affected by AMD.

Collaborating reseachers from the Department of Ophthalmology at the Bonn University Hospital and the Neural Stem Cell Institute in New York have successfully replaced damaged cells in eyes impaired by Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) with human stem cells. This implantation technique, conducted in an animal study is the first of its kind and represents a significant advance in developing personalized treatments for patients suffering from a variety of age-related visual impairment issues. Continue reading

Stem Cells Utilized to Grow Body Parts and Organs for Wounded Soldiers

Advances in regenerative medicine, spearheaded by AFIRM [Armed Forces Institute of Regenerative Medicine], are restoring function to wounded soldiers. A consortium of research centers is developing techniques to grow body parts, such as ears, bones, skin and genitals.  AFIRM is directing 300 million dollars to develop a broad array of regenerative treatments that will impact treatment options for both wounded soldiers and the general population.  Many of the treatments are now entering the clinical [human] testing phase with the prospect of growing organs and tissue ‘on demand’ utilizing the patient’s own stem cells on the horizon. Continue reading