Lung Regeneration Made Possible through Stem Cells.

Scientists have found a stem cell line that specializes in restoring lung tissue

Jackson Laboratory scientists have identified the adult lung stem cells p63+/Krt5+ as the specific cell line that specializes in lung regeneration.  In an animal model, professors Frank McKeon, Ph.D. and Wa Xian, Ph.D. observed as the p63+/Krt5+, which typically mature into the lungs’ alveoli, responded to lung damage caused by the H1N1 influenza virus by migrating to the sites of inflammation and restoring the lost tissue. Continue reading

Multiple Sclerosis Trial Exhibits Positive Results of Stem Cell Therapy.

A five year phase II clinical trial has shown initial success in treating multiple sclerosis.

In a recent update of an ongoing five year clinical trial conducted by the Chicago Blood Cancer Institute, patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis have experienced suppression of disease-related inflammation as a result of hematopoietic stem cell transplantations.  The stem cells have the ability to regulate the autoimmune attack on the central nervous system, and have provided 82.8% of the patients with two years thus far of event-free disease remission. Continue reading

In with a BAM – Stem Cells Advance Bladder Regeneration

The bladder acellular matrix is a housing of connective tissue that provides structural support for the functional cells of the bladder

New research from McGill University has shown that the bladder acellular matrix [BAM], or the external structure of connective tissue and growth factors that house the cellular components of the bladder, can serve as a scaffolding unit for mesenchymal stem cells [MSCs] to regenerate healthy bladder tissue.  The stem cells receive growth factors from the BAM, which direct them to differentiate into new bladder cells that, when transplanted into an animal model, exhibit nearly 100% normal bladder capacity and function. Continue reading

Bone Regeneration Technique Stimulates Stem Cells with Magnetic Nanoparticles.

Remote controlled nanoparticles may allow stem cells to regenerate bone tissue

Medical researchers from Keele University and Nottingham University have integrated remote controlled magnetic nanoparticles to incite the differentiation of stem cells into new bone tissue for the treatment of bone diseases, disorders, and injuries. In pre-clinical trials, the nanoparticles were coated with proteins that stimulate the stem cells, and then delivered directly to the damaged tissue via an external magnetic field. Continue reading

Feeling the Burn: Fat Loss Therapy Utilizes Stem Cells.

Scientists have identified two stimulants that induce stem cells to mature into brown fat cells instead of unhealthy white fat cells.

According to a recent study conducted by scientists at the Harvard Stem Cell Institute, stem cells may hold the key to replacing the body’s unwanted storage of white fat cells with calorie-burning brown fat cells. The researchers studied the stem cells that typically mature into white fat cells, and, after screening the effects of 1000 compounds on the cells, they found two that stimulate the stem cells to differentiate into brown fat cells instead.  Continue reading

Listen to Your Gut – “Mini-Stomachs” Built In-Vitro from Stem Cells.

Scientists have engineered cellular clusters that mimic the functions of the stomach.

Scientists at the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Centre have induced adult stem cells to differentiate into small clusters of gastric tissue that replicate the functions of the human stomach.  The lab-made structures, known as “mini-stomachs”, were created by replicating the chemical pathways of early stage stomach development of stem cells in a petri dish.   Continue reading

Low Blood Cell Counts Could Be Treated by Regulating Stem Cells.

Megakaryotes may hold the ability to regulate the amount of blood that stem cells produce.

According to new research from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research, hematopoietic stem cells [stem cells that produce blood] are directly regulated by megakaryocytes, the blood cells responsible for healing wounds.  The researchers found that megakaryotes produce two growth factors; one that signals for hematopoietic stem cells to proliferate, and one that keeps them in an inactive state.  This relationship controls the amount of blood being produced in the body. Continue reading

Inflammatory Disease Healed with Stem Cells

Stem cells located in the gums have the ability to regulate inflammatory conditions.

A research team led by Dr. Songtao Shi from the Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry of USC has discovered that mesenchymal stem cells [MSCs] found in the gums are able to regulate the body’s immune system to treat inflammatory diseases.  In an animal model suffering from colitis [an inflamed condition of the colon], the scientists were able to transplant these gingival MSCs, significantly reducing the inflammation. Continue reading

A Sight for Sore Eyes – Stem Cells Discovered on Surface of Retina.

Scientists may one day be able to treat AMD with stem cells from the retina.

A team of researchers led by Professor Andrew Lotery at Southampton General Hospital have discovered a source of retinal stem cells on the surface of the eye.  If scientists can harvest these readily accessible stem cells, convert them to light-sensitive cells, and then transplant them back into the eye, the cells could provide new treatments for age-related macular degeneration [AMD].

Currently, AMD is the leading cause for blindness in patients over the age of 50, and there is no known cure. However, the discovery of stem cells on the retina could facilitate a new method for scientists to replenish the light-sensitive cells in a patient’s eyes without the risk of rejection by the immune system, presenting a new potential treatment for the disease.

Although AMD tends to affect patients later on in life, the higher regenerative abilities of younger stem cells are preferable over older ones for medical therapies.  One way to assure access to the enhanced regenerative abilities of your own stem cells is to preserve them while they are still young, so that they can be used later in life in emerging regenerative therapies. Today, preserving your own stem cells, also known as autologous stem cells, is simple and affordable for families. To learn how you can preserve your own valuable stem cells through non-invasive and effective methods, please visit StemSave or call 877-783-6728 (877-StemSave) today.

 

 

To view the full article, click here.

 

 

The Future of Regenerative Medicine is Now™.

Stem Cells Grow Human Intestines Successfully

Scientists have engineered human intestinal tissue through the use of stem cells.

Researchers from the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Centre have successfully grown functional human intestinal tissues by utilizing stem cells. After stimulating the stem cells with a “molecular cocktail” of chemicals and growth factors, the team observed as the cells developed into the mucosal lining and muscle layers, while exhibiting digestive functions such as nutrient uptake and responding to molecular signals. Continue reading