Burn Treatment Replaces Skin Grafts with Stem Cells.

Stem cells may eliminate the need for painful skin grafts for burn victims.

In a new two year clinical trial conducted by the University of Miami, researchers will attempt to treat deep second degree burn victims with mesenchymal stem cells [MSCs] as a potential alternative to skin grafts.  The team, led by Dr. Evangelos Badiavas, will first cover the wounds in protective dressing, and then inject the MSCs under the dressing and into the wounds to spur the regeneration of the inner and outer layers of skin.

Severe burns currently account for 450,000 emergency room treatments annually, as well as 15-20% of combat injuries to military veterans.  But despite a high demand to eliminate painful and taxing skin graft surgeries, they are currently the only option for reconstruction.  While Dr. Badiavas’ stem cell therapy is in its initial assessment phase, early indications point to  possible MSC treatments that may  provide a more comfortable and efficient method to regenerate healthy skin tissue, resulting in better outcomes for patients.

As regenerative engineering progresses, we believe the best stem cells to use in emerging treatments will be the patient’s own [autologous stem cells] as this negates the need to find a suitable donor and eliminates the chances of rejection of the transplanted tissue. To learn more about banking your own valuable stem cells to insure your family’s future health, visit StemSave or call 877-783-6728 (877-StemSave) today.

 

 

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The Future of Regenerative Medicine is Now™

Feeling the Burn: Fat Loss Therapy Utilizes Stem Cells.

Scientists have identified two stimulants that induce stem cells to mature into brown fat cells instead of unhealthy white fat cells.

According to a recent study conducted by scientists at the Harvard Stem Cell Institute, stem cells may hold the key to replacing the body’s unwanted storage of white fat cells with calorie-burning brown fat cells. The researchers studied the stem cells that typically mature into white fat cells, and, after screening the effects of 1000 compounds on the cells, they found two that stimulate the stem cells to differentiate into brown fat cells instead.  Continue reading

Esophagus Engineered with Stem Cells In-Vivo.

Scientists have utilized stem cells to engineer an esophagus without exogenous growth factors.

Researchers from the Saban Research Institute of Children’s Hospital Los Angeles have grown esophageal tissue in vivo (in the body) from stem cells without the use of exogenous growth factors.  In an animal model, the scientists transplanted stem cells, as well as a simple biodegradable scaffold, and relied on the stem cells’ ability to migrate towards the tissue in need of repair.  The cells then differentiated into the epithelial, muscle, and nerve cells to develop a healthy esophagus. Continue reading

Game, Set, Match: Tennis Elbow Gets Aced by Stem Cell Therapy

In a new pilot study at the Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital in London, researchers will utilize stem cells to promote the healing of painful tendon injuries such as tennis elbow.  Initial studies suggest that, upon transplantation, the stem cells release growth factors to the point of injury, which induce the growth of new tendon tissue while reducing scar tissue to recover movement and flexibility. Continue reading

Lupus Therapy Incorporates Mesenchymal Stem Cells

Beijing researchers are capitalizing on the abilities of mesenchymal stem cells to reduce inflammation and promote cell growth to combat systemic lupus erythematosus.

In a recent clinical study conducted in Beijing, researchers are testing a treatment for patients suffering from systemic lupus erythematosus by administering autologous [the patient’s own] mesenchymal stem cells.  The researchers aim to capitalize on the unique abilities of MSCs to not only differentiate into a multitude of different cell types, but to reduce the autoimmune attack in patients affected by lupus as well. Continue reading

ALS Research Capitalizes on Stem Cells.

A recent Mt. Sinai study for ALS is set to enter phase one clinical trials.

Researchers at the Cedars-Mt. Sinai Regenerative Medicine Institute, led by Dr. Robert H. Baloh, have devised a method to study and develop potential treatments for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis [ALS] by utilizing patients’ stem cell-derived neurons.  In an example of what is referred to as translational genomics, researchers extract autologous (the patient’s own) stem cells, correct the defective gene causing the disease, and then, in a potential treatment protocol, transplant the cells back into the patient to reverse neural degeneration. Continue reading

Improving the Efficacy of Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

The protein SIRT1 maintains the regenerative abilities of hematopoietic stem cells.

A research team from Mount Sinai, Harvard Medical School, and Children’s Hospital in Boston has determined the function of protein Sirtuin1 (SIRT1) in maintaining the regenerative ability of blood stem cells.  The researchers found that young stem cells lacking SIRT1 exhibited a similar deficiency in rejuvenating blood as observed in older stem cells.  These older, defunct blood stem cells are unable to refresh the body’s blood supply, resulting in vulnerability to age-related cancers and immune diseases. Continue reading

Studying Mother Nature to Advance Stem Cell Therapies.

Researchers are currently studying the genomes of other animals for new insights into our own stem cell processes.

Researchers led by Professor Christian Peterson from Northwestern University have discovered a gene in flatworm planarians that activates their stem cells to replace lost tissue after an injury.  The gene, called zic-1, allows the stem cells to create completely new organs and body parts, such as the regeneration of a head after decapitation. Continue reading

Stem Cells Utilized to Regulate Extreme Inflammation in Limb Injuries.

Stem cells are being used to reduce extreme inflammation to alleviate strain on the body’s healing process.

Immunologists at the Medical College of Georgia and College of Dental Medicine a Georgia Regents University have developed a method of utilizing autologous [the patient’s own] stem cells to treat Ischemia Reperfusion Injury, a condition in which excessive blood flow to an injury results in severe inflammation and hindered recovery. The stem cells function with a chemical called indoleomine 2,3 Dioxygenase, or IDO, which can regulate the immune response without completely disabling it, allowing the healing process to ensue normally. Continue reading

Of Mice and Men: Human Stem Cells Utilized in Animal Model Treatment of MS Symptoms

Advancements in a breakthrough stem cell study may provide new treatment options for MS patients.

A team of researchers led by Professor Jeanne Loring of the Scripps Research Institute have advanced a potential treatment option for autoimmune diseases similar to multiple sclerosis by utilizing human stem cells to reregulate the immune system. In an animal model paralyzed by MS symptoms, the scientists differentiated human stem cells into early stage neural cells that, when transplanted into the spinal cords of the compromised mice, secreted proteins that halted the autoimmune attack and enabled the mice to walk and run again. Continue reading