Burn Treatment Replaces Skin Grafts with Stem Cells.

Stem cells may eliminate the need for painful skin grafts for burn victims.

In a new two year clinical trial conducted by the University of Miami, researchers will attempt to treat deep second degree burn victims with mesenchymal stem cells [MSCs] as a potential alternative to skin grafts.  The team, led by Dr. Evangelos Badiavas, will first cover the wounds in protective dressing, and then inject the MSCs under the dressing and into the wounds to spur the regeneration of the inner and outer layers of skin.

Severe burns currently account for 450,000 emergency room treatments annually, as well as 15-20% of combat injuries to military veterans.  But despite a high demand to eliminate painful and taxing skin graft surgeries, they are currently the only option for reconstruction.  While Dr. Badiavas’ stem cell therapy is in its initial assessment phase, early indications point to  possible MSC treatments that may  provide a more comfortable and efficient method to regenerate healthy skin tissue, resulting in better outcomes for patients.

As regenerative engineering progresses, we believe the best stem cells to use in emerging treatments will be the patient’s own [autologous stem cells] as this negates the need to find a suitable donor and eliminates the chances of rejection of the transplanted tissue. To learn more about banking your own valuable stem cells to insure your family’s future health, visit StemSave or call 877-783-6728 (877-StemSave) today.

 

 

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The Future of Regenerative Medicine is Now™

Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome Treatment Integrates Cardiac Stem Cells.

Initial trials of stem cell treatment for hypoplastic left heart syndrome have proven to be both safe and effective for children with the congenital defect.

Researchers from Okayama University have developed a method to treat the congenital heart defect known as hypoplastic left heart syndrome [HLHS] by utilizing a specialized cardiac stem cell.  In a Phase I clinical trial conducted on children suffering from HLHS, the scientists concluded that, because the young stem cells in children are more abundant and self-renewing than those in adults, intracoronary injection of stem cells is a safe and feasible approach to treating the condition. Continue reading

Stroke-Induced Brain Damage Prevented by Stem Cells.

Stem cells have been found to prevent neurological damage to GCI stroke victims.

In a recently published study from the Hallym University College of Medicine, researchers have applied mesenchymal stem cells [MSCs] to animal models afflicted with global cerebral ischemia [GCI] to successfully reduce the associated neuronal damage.  When compared to those that received no treatment, animals that received MSCs displayed a significant decrease in cell death, inflammation to the brain, and disruption of the blood brain barrier. Continue reading

Type 1 Diabetes Reversed by Integrating Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

MSCs and HCELL molecules track down islet cells and reverse inflammation.

According to a recently published study from the Brigham and Woman’s Hospital, mesenchymal stem cells [MSCs] have the ability to reverse type I diabetes by suppressing the auto-immune attack of islet cells.  Although the MSCs cannot be directly injected into the pancreas, the researchers utilized the surface adhesion molecule HCELL to hone the stem cells in on the inflamed islets, allowing them to normalize blood sugar levels without the use of insulin. Continue reading

Atherosclerotic Lesions Prevented by MSCs

Stem cells were found to reduce plaque in patients with atherosclerosis.

According to new research from the National Yang-Ming University, mesenchymal stem cells [MSCs] hold the ability to limit atherosclerotic plaque formation, thereby preventing the onset of harmful endothelial lesions. The research team, led by Shih-Chieh Hung, transplanted MSCs into animal models with atherosclerosis and observed significant reduction in plaque formation. They also saw an increase in blood vessel dilation, which prevents further plaque development, indicating good endothelial health. Continue reading