Stem Cells Make a Dentin Tooth Decay.

Researchers have utilized low-intensity lasers to regenerate lost dentin in damaged teeth.

Researchers at the National Institute for Dental and Craniofacial Research have developed a method of utilizing autologous [the patient’s own] dental stem cells to regenerate damaged or decayed teeth.  In an animal model, as well as human cells in vitro [in a lab], the scientists treated the damaged teeth with low-intensity lasers, which prompted the stem cells located in the dental pulp to differentiate and grow into new, healthy dentin tissue.

While this procedure is, in itself, a breakthrough in dental stem cell therapy, it also has the potential to significantly advance the field of regenerative medicine as a whole.  According to the study’s principle investigator Praveen Arany, stem cells and low intensity lasers could be used in the near future for healing wounds, regenerating cardiac tissue, reducing inflammation, and repairing bone damage.

This research is yet another example of how autologous [a patient’s own] stem cells are influencing the outcome of treatment options. To learn more about stem cells, and how families can bank their own valuable stem cells by recovering the very powerful dental pulp stem cells during routine dental procedures; such as wisdom teeth extractions or the during the loss of baby teeth, visit StemSave or call 877-783-6728 (877-StemSave) today.

 

 

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