Of Mice and Men: Human Stem Cells Utilized in Animal Model Treatment of MS Symptoms

Advancements in a breakthrough stem cell study may provide new treatment options for MS patients.

A team of researchers led by Professor Jeanne Loring of the Scripps Research Institute have advanced a potential treatment option for autoimmune diseases similar to multiple sclerosis by utilizing human stem cells to reregulate the immune system. In an animal model paralyzed by MS symptoms, the scientists differentiated human stem cells into early stage neural cells that, when transplanted into the spinal cords of the compromised mice, secreted proteins that halted the autoimmune attack and enabled the mice to walk and run again.

Multiple Sclerosis affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide, causing 18,000 deaths per year.  As this breakthrough research progresses, the unique properties of human stem cells present the opportunity for developing personalized treatments that will have new implications for MS patients in the near future.

We believe the best stem cells to use in these emerging regenerative treatments will be the patient’s own [autologous stem cells] as this negates the need to find a suitable donor and eliminates the chances of rejection of the transplanted tissue. To learn more about banking your own valuable stem cells to insure your family’s future health, visit StemSave or call 877-783-6728 (877-StemSave) today.

 

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